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Think before you bathe

17: Community Champion

Many of us will already have worked this one out, but it's as well not to use your phone in the bath while it's connected to the charger. Actually, it's probably not the best idea to use it in the bath, even when it isn't connected to the charger, as it may not prove to be as waterproof as you hope.

 

From The Guardian

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15 REPLIES
17: Community Champion

Any loss of life is sad but in those circumstances where common sense should have prevailed is awful.   Smiley Sad

 

My phone is ip68 certified but I still wouldn't take it into the bathroom. It's not just the water but steam too. 

 

I read on another forum where a person chooses to regular dunk their phone in a wash basin to clean it !

 

 

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17: Community Champion

A few years back now, I posted a link to an article about exactly how dirty the average mobile phone is, and the organisms that might inhabit it. It was a pretty distressing article, and I had to resist the temptation to lather my phone with soap and run it under the hot tap.

 

It was a pretty basic early smartphone, and certainly wouldn't have survived the treatment, but the article did make me think twice about using my phone while cooking - and, of course, the steam associated with cooking isn't great news, either, though I don't think any of my phones have actually suffered steam damage.

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17: Community Champion

One of the early bits of advice when affixing a screen shield was to run the shower / bath and then carry out the fixing in the bathroom as the dust would have been dampened down by the steam. 

 

Even I did this not really thinking of the effects that steam can do inside the early phones that were in no way waterproofed or indeed the modern ones today that also are not. 

 

I use a micro fibre cloth cloth that I replace every month. 

 

Unfortunately the trend of taking your phone everywhere and I mean everywhere Smiley Wink phones can indeed pick up all sorts of grime and bugs. 

 

 

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17: Community Champion
The terrible idiocy of the poor person who died is beyond belief. Phones are meant to be very dirty and I read that beards are equally horrible. I'd better shave and ditch the phone.

There's a reason why there are no plugs in British bathrooms and this story is why.

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17: Community Champion

There is another risk to phones - it won't prove fatal, but it can do a lot of damage. That is the presence of DEET in some of the more powerful insect repellants, especially those intended for use in malarial areas.

 

As a birdwatcher, I have been aware for many years of the damage that DEET can inflict, particularly on plastics, varnishes and the optical coatings on lenses. You end up with the stuff on the palms of your hands as you apply it to your exposed skin, and unless you then wash your hands very thoroughly (thus removing the repellant from your hands) you end up applying it to anything else you touch. Over the years, I have wrecked 2 wristwatches, 2 pairs of spectacles, and the rubber armouring on a pair of binoculars. Friends using spray repellants have also removed the chromatic coatings from binocular and telescope lenses.

 

Logically, phones must be at risk of exactly the same damage, and it will become more prevalent as mobile coverage is extended in tropical areas. As I've been typing this, I wondered why none of my phones had fallen victim to DEET, and the answer is simple - the phone signal hasn't been there, so my phone has remained in my pocket, in the bottom of my rucksack, or even in the bottom of my suitcase. But this signal-free situation is changing rapidly in many parts of the world, so remember that mobile phones and insect repellants may not mix well.

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2: Seeker

i am like you - water and electrics do not go - full stop.

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17: Community Champion
'xactly so!

And welcome to the Forum!

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17: Community Champion

I was gobsmacked that the coroner was going to write to Apple to suggest they put a warning on the device/charger.   Really?   Have we gone stark staring bonkers?   I mean, I know we're all looking for someone else to blame for our misfortunes - preferably Social Services - but shouldn't some commonsense be part of basic life?  Maybe everything should come with a large sticker saying DON'T BE AN IDIOT!

 

Yes, there's a reason why we don't have electric sockets in bathrooms, though I've stayed in French houses and they do - unshuttered and right under the light switch, where you're totally unlikely to stick your fingers in it, bleary, in the dark!

 

Dirty phones have been a thing for years.  Phone sanitising used to be a thing - there's a joke about it in Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and my father used to use a service called Phonotas.  With our current obsession with cleanliness, why has it died out?

 

If you must charge in the bath, I suppose you could use a portable charger, though I wouldn't fancy being on the end of the kind of current they can deliver if shorted.  Even that could be enough to kill you.

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17: Community Champion
Phonotas!! Blimey that brings back memories.

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17: Community Champion

Annie_N wrote:

There is another risk to phones - it won't prove fatal, but it can do a lot of damage. That is the presence of DEET in some of the more powerful insect repellants, especially those intended for use in malarial areas.

 

As a birdwatcher, I have been aware for many years of the damage that DEET can inflict, particularly on plastics, varnishes and the optical coatings on lenses. You end up with the stuff on the palms of your hands as you apply it to your exposed skin, and unless you then wash your hands very thoroughly (thus removing the repellant from your hands) you end up applying it to anything else you touch. Over the years, I have wrecked 2 wristwatches, 2 pairs of spectacles, and the rubber armouring on a pair of binoculars. Friends using spray repellants have also removed the chromatic coatings from binocular and telescope lenses.

 

Logically, phones must be at risk of exactly the same damage, and it will become more prevalent as mobile coverage is extended in tropical areas. As I've been typing this, I wondered why none of my phones had fallen victim to DEET, and the answer is simple - the phone signal hasn't been there, so my phone has remained in my pocket, in the bottom of my rucksack, or even in the bottom of my suitcase. But this signal-free situation is changing rapidly in many parts of the world, so remember that mobile phones and insect repellants may not mix well.


Thanks for this @Annie_N didnt know that, as one who is eaten alive by creepy crawlies when abroad I have purchased some repelant with DEET in for my Carribean trip later this year so will be extra careful when handling things !

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17: Community Champion

Phonotas - yes, I vaguely remember them. Rightly or wrongly, I associate them with the chap who went round the first office building I worked in, cleaning the typewriters. The keys used to get choked with ink from the ribbons (if you remember typewriters of that sort!), and they were cleaned with meths as the solvent - and you could tell when the chap was in the building, as the smell of the meths drifted down any corridor which he had walked down. Heaven knows what a working life of occupational exposure to meths can have done to him, but we office juniors just worried how his wife coped with the smell when he got home.

 

@63johnw It occurs to me that I ought to write a new thread about the perils of DEET for phones - it's not the sort of damage you'd want on a top-of-range phone, so perhaps it needs a bit more emphasis.

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17: Community Champion
Phonotas was just office desk phones. A spray and a cloth. Amazing how to think of such a service. I don't recall typewriter cleaners in the same way.

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17: Community Champion

jeffkinn wrote:
I don't recall typewriter cleaners in the same way.

Well, I think you're a few years younger than me Smiley Wink

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17: Community Champion

My father sold wholesale stationery and print.  I used to have a box of type cleaner sticks from his unsold stock that held a solvent you squeezed onto a felt pad on the end.   I also had things a bit like a soft eraser that you pressed onto the type to get bits out of the closed letters.  Film ribbons did away with all that.   Slightly OT, I once put a fabric ribbon in a dot-matrix computer printer that normally used film ones.  Totally gummed up the pins, though WD40 solved that.   Abandoned fabric ribbon!

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12: Established

BandOfBrothers wrote:

Any loss of life is sad but in those circumstances where common sense should have prevailed is awful.   Smiley Sad

 

Unfortunately, in my experience, sense is not very common. 

However as you say it is very sad. 

 

 


 

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