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Other broadband queries

Vodafone broadband cancelled without being asked - extremely poor service

2: Seeker

My vodafone broadband has just been cancelled without me being asked.  I will now be left without internet as of Tuesday, through no fault of my own. I am EXTREMELY annoyed at the situation, as I work from home and hence NEED broadband access.  Here is a potted history of the sorry saga:

 

Sat 2nd Feb: I receive a letter from BT saying that someone will be taking over my broadband line (on 12th Feb). The letter says to phone my existing provider (Vodafone) if this letter has been sent in error.  I immediately phone Vodafone and explain the situation.  I am assured that the takeover request from BT has been cancelled, and my broadband will continue as normal.

 

Tues 5th Feb: I receive a letter from Vodafone saying that my account is being taken over, and to call if this has been sent in error. I again call Vodafone and explain the situation.  Again, I am told that the takeover request has been cancelled and that my broadband will continue as normal.

 

Sun 10th Feb: I receive an email from Vodafone asking me to send my router back.  Surprised, I log in to my Vodafone account to see that my account has been cancelled. I of course call Vodafone to find out what is going on.  After talking to several people, it seems that despite my earlier calls and several notes on my account NOT to cancel the broadband, it has gone ahead anyway.  Apparently, there is no way of reinstating my broadband without starting a new contract (which I will not do given Vodafone's clearly appalling customer service). I am not even going to be offered any form of compensation.

 

I work from home, and therefore NEED broadband to be able to do my job. Unfortunately, I am now being left without a broadband connection, despite NEVER having asked to lose my connection and several phone calls to the contrary. I would like to claim compensation for this appalling state of affairs.

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7 REPLIES 7
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10: Established

It's a blessing,   myself and hundreds of other customers would love to leave but can't.

 

The best advice you will get from 2019 run for the hills and don't look back,  vodafone should not be a internet provider it should be against trade description. 

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2: Seeker

Hah, thanks for reply, at least it gave me a laugh

 

Funnily enough, vodafone's only solution to the problem was to try to get me to start a new broadband contract. I of course told them to go away...

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Anonymous
Not applicable

just get a 4g dongle for the 14 days it will take to get a nice new fast relible broardband installed, you could also ask the new provider to fast track the order, there maybe a small fee.

 

i would be exstatic if voadphone cancled my contract

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Moderator (Retired)

That's certainly not great to hear @steve_eh I can totally understand the frustration it will cause you, especially as you rely on the internet.

 

There's only a small window of opportunity in which we can reject an erroneous takeover, so unfortunately it's not always successful. I’m sorry if we've been unable to stop your service from leaving us.

 

We’d be happy to speak you in a bit more detail about what's happened, so if I've sent you a private message with information on how to get in touch.

 

Blair

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2: Seeker

Blair,

 

That's not really acceptable, given that a) I phoned Vodafone as soon as I received the first letter through my door advising me about the erroneous takover and b) that when I finally found out that my account had been cancelled, the operator actually told me that he could see that my previous phonecalls (ie. requests to cancel the takeover) had been noted on my file.

 

What is the point of sending out letters advising of a takeover, when my response to these letters was completely ignored?

 

I will reply to your PM with further details, and would be happy to discuss some form of compensation for a) the loss of service and b) the time spent chasing this up.

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10: Established

@steve_eh wrote:

Hah, thanks for reply, at least it gave me a laugh

 

Funnily enough, vodafone's only solution to the problem was to try to get me to start a new broadband contract. I of course told them to go away...


Speak with Ofcom.  It happened to me (with EE) but no letters from a new ISP or from EE prior to a 'sorry to see you go’ text on the day the internet and landline were disconnected.

EE claimed that another ISP (at my instigation) had ordered the migration.  Ofgem contacted Openreach who said that the disconnection was ordered by EE and no third party was involved.  EE persisted with the story of a third party taking over the line, thus implying that Ofcom & Openreach are liars.

They reconnected me... new contract & new phone number and some compensation but with that came a new cooling off period.  I jumped ship at that point but it was out of the EE frying pan into the Vodafone fire raging inferno of abysmal service and even more abysmal support.  Following a formal complaint I finally got a letter of deadlock and a release from my one sided, loaded in Vodafone' favour contract.

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10: Established

@Blair wrote:

There's only a small window of opportunity in which we can reject an erroneous takeover, so unfortunately it's not always successful. I’m sorry if we've been unable to stop your service from leaving us.

 Blair


The whole idea of letters ten days before the planned migration date is to give the subscriber a the opportunity to cancel / prevent unauthorised migrations.

See here for the rules if you are unsure of them.  Here is a brief extract.

7. Should the consumer change their mind then, with effect from the start of this process, they will have a minimum of 10 working days to contact the new (gaining) ISP and stop the switch.

Meanwhile consumers who fear that they’ve become a victim of slamming (i.e. being switched without your knowledge or consent) should instead contact their existing (losing) provider, which will use Ofcom’s Cancel Other process to stop the order going ahead. Consumers are also advised to contact the gaining provider too.

8. If no cancellation is received within the 10 day transfer period then the service is officially switched.

Seem fairly clear... if the process had been followed there was plenty of time to prevent an unauthorised /unwanted transfer.    Does Vodafone have a special exemption from any part of  Ofcom's General Condition 22?

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