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Pay as you go

Top-up vouchers

4: Newbie

On 10th July at 2.41 I went to the West Bromwich Store for a £20 top-up voucher, to be paid for with cash -  Jaskaran was the name on the voucher - and it was the usual fast and efficient transaction. While there I was told that Vodafone Stores were going cashless and next time I would need my debit card. This sounds very much to me like a backward step, cutting customer choice and possibly in future pushing us away from top-ups and towards contracts. This would be anathema to me - I much prefer to top up as I need to and not be tied to a monthly amount which I may not fully use. I much prefer to use my card only when absolutely necessary. I have been with Vodafone since about 2009 and I would really not want to be going anywhere else, although I suspect there will be similar from other providers.  

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13 REPLIES 13
17: Community Champion

Hi @ExGlos_04

 

I've not heard that Vodafone UK Highstores are no longer going to be accepting cash as payments. 

Did they say when ?

If that includes people wanting to buy phones and accessories too Then there could be lost sales imo.

Handling cash brings about extra costs for shops such as the cost for it to be collected etc but that wouldn't outweigh the possible loss of sales imo.

Hopefully the Vodafone Social Media Team here will be able to look into this for you. 

Current Phone > Samsung Note 10+ 5G _256Gb > Model: SM-N976B.

Samsung One Ui  / Pie.

 

Samsung Gear s3 Frontier Watch.

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17: Community Champion

I've no idea if this is true or not but what I do know is that there are a lot of places that are now cashless. I see this a lot in London with lunchtime restaurants and it's a worldwide trend. Most younger people these days don't carry cash at all. That's certainly the case with most of my adult children. 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/jun/24/cash-is-just-grief-why-shops-and-bars-want-to-m...

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4: Newbie

I have seen red and white printed notices on card terminals in Vodafone Stores with the wording that they are going cashless. Technology may be fine but over-reliance on it can be a double-edged sword if the system crashes for some reason - think TSB.

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17: Community Champion
Very true but the march of this technology is inevitable. It’s advisable to carry more than one form of payment method these days. Perhaps a bank debit card and a credit card from an independent provider like MBNA. Make one Visa and the other MasterCard. Apple Pay and Google Pay are also becoming more widespread. I don’t see stares so much these days when I put my Apple Watch on a card reader.

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17: Community Champion

My local store in Northumberland is already cash free.

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Moderator

@ExGlos_04 Some of our stores have gone cashless with a trial that we've been running.

With any changes that may happen with cashless payments in store, we'll always ensure that our customers are made aware when visiting and through notices that will be in-store.

It'd be a shame to see you leave us because of this however we do appreciate any feedback that you have regarding this and will pass this on to the relevant department.

If there's anything that we can help with in the future, please don't hesitate to let us know - our team and Community are always here 

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4: Newbie

The march of technology is inevitable sounds rather defeatist to me. I do not have a credit card - some years ago I did but it was cancelled as I wasn't using it, it was one I kept for emergencies only. Apple Pay and Google Pay don't come into it - I don't have a smartphone or any other device and wouldn't waste money on such expensive toys. I sometimes wonder how many operations have had to be carried out to surgically remove devices from peoples hands. An ex-police chief in Sweden has warned of the dangers of a cashless world.

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17: Community Champion

do you have a bank account with a debit card ? these are accepted too.

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17: Community Champion

The simple fact is that we are going cashless, just as we're adopting internet banking.  (Personally, I'm not happy with the latter as long as it's not completely secure and the payment system remains not fit for purpose, but that's another matter.   I do rarely use cash, though.)

Handling cash is an expensive process for shops and the rate at which bank branches are closing makes it even more of a problem - a lot of shops are now not within easy reach of somewhere they can pay takings in and, the further you have to carry cash, the greater the security risk.

There will be people who, for one reason or another need or want to use cash.  I'm not sure how that circle can be squared.   Financial institutions like abandoning cash because it's more profitable for them and authorities like the lack of anonymity.

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13: Advanced Member

You can buy top-up vouchers in all major supermarkets (even at the self-scan tills) and most convenience stores. Some of the latter will probably be going cashless as soon as they can, because of the risks that cash poses for them. However, I imagine that the supermarkets will continue to take cash for a good long time - they're able to minimise the actual cash they handle by turning some of it around as cash-back, and they can also deal in a secure fashion with collection arrangements for cash.

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17: Community Champion
It’s about time the cash back limit was raised. It’s been £50 for many years.

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13: Advanced Member

Yes, indeed, though I wonder how the card-issuers would feel about that, since they all want us to go cashless asap. Stores might also be anxious about it as cash is used less - a couple of people wanting £100 cash-back when purchasing 500ml of milk might clear out even a large superstore. Though maybe the stores have a minimum spend for cash-back, to avoid being taken advantage of - it must be years since I last used it, so I'm a bit unsure now of the details..

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17: Community Champion
Never noticed a minim spend and if £50 is easily managed so would £100. Cars issuers will be happy as a card is being used for that transaction. They don’t care if you’re buying products or getting cash I don’t suppose.

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