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Pay as you go

telephoning in another country

andrewkennedy
4: Newbie

Just starting with a new Smartphone.  I live in France.  When I am making a phone call (to a land line or mobie) away from home i.e. on holiday in Spain or in th UK I presume I need to put their  country post code first, then do I miss out the first number of thier number i.e. '0'.    Or is it okay to simple dial the number exactly as it is?!?  I reallise phoning to a landline I have to put the country code first.

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7 REPLIES 7
BandOfBrothers
17: Community Champion

I believe it could be +44 and the first 0 left off. 

This is what I would do in the UK. 

Current Phone >

Samsung Z Fold³ 5G.

Previous Phone >

Samsung Note 20 Ultra 5G - SM9860.

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andrewkennedy
4: Newbie

I live in France but will be traveling in other countries.  It would make sence to enter my phone contacts complete with the area codes, however, if I am at home in France and make a local call from my contacts ( with the area code in place) is that going to connect just as it would without the area code?!? 

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63johnw
17: Community Champion

Hi @andrewkennedy I think they would work fine, in England I have contacts saved with +44 then the number and they work for me when I call them in the UK.

 

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adamg
2: Seeker

Hi - if you are using your French mobile to dial numbers when abroad then you need to put them into international format e.g. to dial a UK London (020) number from your French mobile the dial +44 20 <number>; calling back to France you'd need to put +33 in front of the numbers you are dialling (dropping the 0); e.g. +33 123456; 

 

Always use the '+' rather than '00' 

 

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hrym
17: Community Champion

If you look at the Call Settings section of the phone's main menu, you should see an option for what to do with storeed numbers for international purposes.   If you're storing with the country code, make sure this is set to "dial as stored" (that's not the exact wording, but it's the sense).

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donnyguy
16: Advanced member

I've always ensured my phone numbers are saved in my phone in the international format for exactly this reason. Before the EU roaming rules, I would regularly swap sim cards when travelling so this kept me right.

But in your case, if you're calling French numbers then yes, it's a case of adding +33 and dropping the initial zero. So if you were calling a French mobile 06 28 51 xx yy, then you'd dial it as +33 6 28 51 xx yy. Same with a landline, 04 56 54 xx yy becomes +33 4 56 54 xx yy

Calling a UK number is the same, a mobile 07788 xxyyxx becomes +44 7788 xxyyxx and a landline 020 8587 xxyy becomes +44 20 8587 xxyy

Some countries (e.g. Spain) don't have the initial zero so calling a Spanish number 655 114 xyx is simply a case of adding +34 to the front making it +34 655 114 xyx.

 

But if youre unsure of dialling rules when overseas and your phone doesn't have the international assist feature then I'd definitely consider updating the numbers in your phone book to the international format then they'll simply work from anywhere, home or abroad.

 

 

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ToniCa
13: Advanced Member

Using + and the country code for the number you are dialling saves a lot of trouble. Generally speaking, the "exit code" to make a call to a different country is 00, but it does vary from one country to another, eg it's 011 from USA. So saving all numbers in the +44 format, or whatever, avoids having to worry about the exit code from the country you're in.  A reasonably comprehensive list of codes can be found on https://www.howtocallabroad.com/codes.html - which demonstrates the value of using + instead!

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